Tag Archives: Tools Exclusively from HIC Harold Import Co.

Cantaloupe and Blueberry Ice Pops

Cantaloupe and Blueberry Ice Pops

Cantaloupe and Blueberry Ice Pops

Temperatures are warming, days are at their longest, and with the bounty of fresh produce available at markets this time of year, we thought it would be fun to roll up our sleeves and make our very own frozen treats. We started experimenting with some less traditional ice pop flavors last summer, like watermelon and raspberry. Cantaloupe is at its peak now until September so we opted to make an ice pop with this sweet, water-rich fruit, throwing in plump fresh blueberries for a little texture. Cantaloupe and Blueberry Ice Pop Recipe First purée 3 cups of cut cantaloupe in a food processor (a blender could work too.)

Cantaloupe Puree

Cantaloupe Puree

Pour the purée into your ice pop mold, filling about 1/3 of the way (use any vessel you choose, but we found the volume in this recipe worked well with our set of 4 Ice Pop Molds.) Drop in a few blueberries. Then continue to pour the cantaloupe purée into the mold, followed by the addition of blueberries, alternating cantaloupe purée and blueberries until the mold is filled to within about 1/2 inch from the top lip (leaving room for the cap, and a little expansion of the contents as it freezes.)

Ice Pop Mold Filled with Cantaloupe and Blueberry Mixture

Ice Pop Mold Filled with Cantaloupe and Blueberry Mixture

Ingredients

Tools

Freeze for about 3 hours, or until firm. If you prefer more of a cantaloup blueberry slush, remove from the freezer after 1-2 hours, and enjoy!

Cantaloupe and Blueberry Ice Pop Fully Frozen

Cantaloupe and Blueberry Ice Pop Fully Frozen

 

Cantaloupe and Blueberry Slush

Cantaloupe and Blueberry Slush

Contributed by Nicole Herman of HIC, Harold Import Co.

Garlic Press Test from the Brooklyn Homemaker

Garlic Press Test with the Brooklyn Homemaker

Garlic Press Test with the Brooklyn Homemaker

Have you met Tux? He’s the author of a fabulous blog called Brooklyn Homemaker, coming in 4th place in the “Homies” blog awards! HUGE! He shares recipes, stories, and gives in-depth reviews of gadgets too.
In his latest post, Tux de-bunks the garlic press, putting models of all price points to the test.

Read the full post here.

We want to thank the Brooklyn Homemaker for including Fante’s Cousin Umberto’s Garlic Press, made by Harold Import Co., in this line-up of fine garlic presses. We are honored and humbled to be a part of your consideration set.

Want to find a Fante’s Cousin Umberto’s Garlic Press of your own? Check out Whisk of Brooklyn and Manhattan. Also found in fine kitchen shops nation wide.

Raw Vegetable Pasta

Veggie Pasta Made With The World's Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler

Veggie Pasta Made With The World’s Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler

Creating “pasta” made purely from raw vegetables started gaining momentum along with interest in raw food diets, and has grown in popularity as some seek out gluten-free, low-gluten, or low calorie alternatives to traditional pasta.

If you’re not familiar with raw veggie pasta, it is simply fresh, raw veggies like carrots, summer squash, (shown above) zucchini, as well as other vegetables, turned into strips or curls that resemble spaghetti shaped pasta noodles. There are some helpful tools available that turn these veggies into long spiral shaped pieces, and tools that leave the strips straight.

A great tool for making raw veggie pasta is a spiral slicer, such as the Benriner Cook Helper, if you are going for a curly veggie “noodle.” The Benriner is also a superb kitchen companion when creating a larger volume of veggie pasta, as it turns out a nice big pile of curled strips quickly.

A kitchen gadget that makes quick work of turning raw vegetables into veggie pasta strips, which might surprise you – the julienne peeler.  We put our very own World’s Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler to the veggie pasta making test…

First using the regular blade to remove the rough outer skin of a carrot…

The World's Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler Removing Carrot Skin

The World’s Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler Removing Carrot Skin

The World's Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler Removing Carrot Skin

The World’s Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler Removing Carrot Skin

Then turning the knob and flipping to the julienne blade to turn the inside of the carrot as well as a yellow crook neck summer squash  into a mound of vegetable pasta goodness.

The World's Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler Julienne Blade Making Veggie Pasta

The World’s Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler Julienne Blade Making Veggie Pasta

The World's Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler Julienne Blade Making Summer Squash into Veggie Pasta

The World’s Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler Julienne Blade Making Summer Squash into Veggie Pasta

Looking for the World’s Greatest 3-in-1 Rotational Tri-Blade Peeler? Find yours here and at fine gourmet kitchen shops nationwide.

Settings for regular peeling, soft veggies, and julienne peeling

Settings for regular peeling, soft veggies, and julienne peeling

Strips of Yellow Crook Neck Squash Turned into Veggie Pasta

Strips of Yellow Crook Neck Squash Turned into Veggie Pasta

What next? You can toss the strips into a skillet and warm them, plus top with the creamy sauce of your choice, like Alfredo, pesto, or marinara, for a warm “pasta’ dish. We kept ours simple, tossing the brightly colored carrot and yellow crook neck squash strips in 2 tbs. olive oil, ¼ cup apple cider vinegar, a twist of fresh ground pepper, and a few pinches of sea salt, for a chilled salad. Combine, and eat! Delicious.

Veggie Pasta Made with a Julienne Peeler

Veggie Pasta Made with a Julienne Peeler

Interested in HIC kitchenware for your restaurant or home? Contact Us.

Contributed by Nicole Herman, of HIC, Harold Import Co.

Oven to Table Bakeware: Sweet & Savory Served with Simplicity and Style

Oven To Table Serveware Filled with Sweet and Savory Delights

Oven To Table Bakeware Filled with Sweet and Savory Delights

The kitchen can be a hectic place, which is why I always turn to my favorite tools and cookware to help me get through the process. A key part of my collection is finding multipurpose items that not only save on the space (I’ve a small kitchen), save on time (I’m crunched for time), and add a bit of style to meal service (Why not impress the family with presentation, too?)

When most of us think of multifunctional kitchenware, we think of those small appliances that come with a plug. I use my food processor for everything from chopping vegetables to making dough. I use my electric pressure cooker for sautéing veggies, pressure-cooking beans and for making soup. I use my slow cooker for roasts, casseroles, and keeping mulled wine at perfect temperature for a party. And my professional-grade blender serves up everything from smoothies to freshly ground spices.

But, beyond the multifunctional electric appliances, my kitchen is filled with a few essential pieces of cookware and bakeware. In particular, one of my favorites is my oven-to-table ware — a white, porcelain, fluted baker.

Yes, it’s a basic baker, no bells and whistles, but it’s utility outshines many of my high-end plugged-in tools in the kitchen. The reason is simple: It cooks just about everything, saves me time, and is pretty stylish too.

One of the main benefits of using oven-to-table ware is its utility. One dish goes from freezer to fridge, and from oven (or microwave) to the table. Perfect for use all year round, these pieces are particularly handy during the holiday season, and  are ideal for everything from breakfast, lunch and dinner (Chicken Pot Pie), to appetizers, side dishes (Corn Bread, Wild Mushroom and Pecan Stuffing) and desserts (Parisian Apple Crisp).

My oven-to-table ware is perfect for hectic evenings, casual or formal parties, or for delicious appetizers for game-time. I often pre-make meals, and store them in the freezer until ready to use. If, by chance, there are leftovers, I slip the baker in the fridge, until we’re ready to eat again – when I reheat in the same piece, in either the oven or the microwave.

Another coveted benefit of using my oven-to-table ware is the idea of having fewer dishes to clean. One pot, from freezer to oven to table – is a welcomed choice especially in our home (we don’t have a dishwasher!) Made to last a lifetime, the porcelain oven to table bakers are easily cleaned by hand with soap and water, or in the dishwasher.

Oven-to-table ware comes in all shapes and sizes. It’s best to have several different sizes on hand – some can be single serve, others big enough for a party, and still others sized perfectly for those family one-pot meals.

As for styling, I opt for a classic white. Sure, matching patterned pieces are fun to have, but the classic white glaze with its decorative fluted edges takes me through the seasons, and looks great whenever, or wherever, I use it –  from casual everyday occasions to the formal dinner parties.

Here is one of my favorite meals to make in my oven-to-table baker: (you can find HIC’s Oven-To-Table Fine Porcelain Fluted Baker here)

Polenta Pie

An easy deep-dish pizza with a thick and crunchy cornmeal crust. It takes a total of 1 ¼ hours to prepare, most of which is the crust-baking time. The recipe yields 1, 10-inch pie, which serves four. We like to substitute our favorite vegetables, or those we have currently available. Also, at times we skip the tomato slices and add a bit of tomato sauce instead.

Polenta Pie in Oven to Table Bakeware from HIC

Polenta Pie in Oven to Table Bakeware from HIC

Crust:

  • 1 ½ cups coarse cornmeal
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 ½ cups cold water
  • 2 cups boiling water
  • a little olive oil

Filling:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup thinly sliced bell pepper
  • about 10 mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 small zucchini, thinly sliced
  • 5-6 medium cloves garlic, sliced
  • 2 tsp dried basil (or 2Tbsp minced fresh basil)
  • ½ tsp oregano
  • fresh black pepper
  • ¼ lb. mozzarella cheese, grated
  • 2 small – or 1 medium – ripe tomato(es), sliced

Combine cornmeal, salt, and cold water in a small bowl. Have the boiling water on the stove in a saucepan, and add the cornmeal mixture, whisking. Cook about 10 minutes over low heat, stirring frequently. It will get very thick. Remove from heat, and let cool until it can be handled.

Preheat oven to 275 degrees F. Oil a 10-inch pie pan or baker. Add the polenta, and use a spatula and wet hands to form it into a smooth, thick crust over the bottom and the sides of the pan. Brush the surface with olive oil, and bake uncovered for 45 minutes.

While the crust bakes, heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a medium-sized skillet. Add the onion, and sauté for 5-8 minutes, or until it begins to soften. Add bell pepper, mushrooms, and zucchini, and sauté until everything is tender. Stir in the garlic and herbs, and sauté just a few minutes more.

Turn up the oven to broiling temperature. Sprinkle half the cheese onto the bottom of the baked crust, then add the tomato slices. Spread the sautéed mixture over the tomatoes, and sprinkle the remaining cheese on top. Broil until brown (about 5 minutes), and serve hot.

Source: The New Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen

 Laura Everage is a writer, editor, swimmer, yoga-lover, wife, and mother of four. Her days start very early in the morning, but thanks to her favorite beverage, coffee, she is able to start each day on a good note. Laura began her journey in all things food and beverage related nearly 20 years ago, as Managing Editor of The Gourmet Retailer. She continues to write about food, coffee, tea and kitchenware and is currently working on a book entitled Courage in a Cup: Women, Coffee and the Global Economy. Laura is also founder and editor of her own website, Family Eats, and is editorial director/partner of Coffee Universe.Her work has appeared in a variety of trade magazines as well as consumer publications Saveur and Consumers’ Digest. Laura’s knowledge of the industry has landed her appearances on both the Food Network and Fine Living Network. To contact Laura, email Laura@familyeats.net.

Chefs of EaT: An Oyster Bar Put HIC’s Mortar & Pestle and French Beechwood Utensils to the Test

Our friends Tobias Hogan and Ethan Powell, the creative team of EaT: An Oyster Bar, in Portland, Oregon, have been busy making delicious winter drinks and dishes, a perfect welcome for their guests as they pop in to escape the chilly Northwest winter.

HIC's Marble Mortar & Pestle Used at EaT: An Oyster Bar to Crush Herbs

HIC’s Marble Mortar & Pestle Used at EaT: An Oyster Bar to Crush Herbs

They’ve been using HIC’s little mortar and pestle to crush herbs they use at the bar for some of their house made syrups. Here, Tobias crushed up green cardamom for a cranberry syrup to put in their drink called “A Long Bright Winter” made with the syrup, a little Combier orange liqueur, dash of orange bitters, topped with sparkling wine and an orange twist.

Braise of Rabbit with HIC's French Beechwood Spoon

Braise of Rabbit at EaT: An Oyster Bar with HIC’s French Beechwood Spoon

Here we have a braise of rabbit for a roulade Tobias is making as part of a dinner with R. Stuart Winery, a multi day process. HIC’s French Beechwood Spoons help scrape up the “suc” (juice) to create a “fond” (the tasty brown bits that build in your pan from cooking meat and vegetables) which builds complexity of flavor.

Learn more about Tobias and Ethan here, or say hello on their Facebook Page.

Interested in HIC kitchenware for your restaurant or home? Contact Us.

Contributed by Nicole H., of HIC, Harold Import Co.

Reindeer Cupcake Recipe Using HIC’s Cannonball Ice Ball Tray

Reindeer Cupcakes made with the Cannonball Ice Ball Tray

Reindeer Cupcakes made with HIC’s Cannonball Ice Ball Tray

This holiday season we put our Cannonball Ice Ball Tray to the test, for baking as well as ice making… and feeling in a jolly mood, used it to make reindeer cupcakes.  (You could also create dog, cat, or bunny cupcakes… pretty much any animal with a head and body, just get creative with the decorations!) You can find a Cannonball Ice Ball Tray of your own, here, and in gourmet kitchen shops nationwide.

Reindeer Cupcakes Recipe:

First, prepare batter and fill both traditional cupcake cups (for the body)  and the Cannonball Ice Ball Tray for the reindeer heads.

See our Spice and Pumpkin Cake Batter recipe, and how to bake cake in the Cannonball Ice Ball Tray here. Or, you can use any flavor of cake you desire.

Assembling the reindeer cupcakes:

1. After cupcake cups and cake balls are completely cool, following the recipe found here, use a spoon to scoop a small amount of cake from the top, near the edge, of each cupcake. Create a small divot for the reindeer head to sit in.

Creating Divot for Reindeer Cupcake Head

Creating Divot for Reindeer Cupcake Head

2. Melt baking chocolate in a double boiler. We used Rose’s Silicone Baking Bowl.

Melting Chocolate in Rose's Silicone Baking Bowl

Melting Chocolate in Rose’s Silicone Baking Bowl.

3. Place the cake ball made in the Cannonball Ice Ball Tray into the divot, on top of the melted chocolate, and let cool. This will help hold the head nicely in place.

Reindeer Head on Cupcake Body

Reindeer Head on Cupcake Body

4. Decorate the face, as you choose. We used cinnamon imperials for the nose, dried currants for the eyes, and white icing for the feet and base of the eyes and nose.

5. Creating the antlers – put some melted dark baking chocolate from Rose’s Silicone Baking Bowl (find yours here) into a pastry bag fitted with a fine tip, and pipe the chocolate into antler shapes on a Silpat baking mat. Place in refrigerator to cool.

Reindeer Antlers Piped on Silpat Baking Mat

Reindeer Antlers Piped on Silpat Baking Mat

6. Press the base of each antler into the cupcake behind the reindeer’s head.

Reindeer Cupcakes Made with the Cannonball Ice Ball Tray

Reindeer Cupcakes Made with the Cannonball Ice Ball Tray

Enjoy!

Interested in learning more about HIC, Harold Import Co.? Contact us here.

Contributed by Nicole H., of HIC, Harold Import Co.

Cannonball Ice Ball Tray Tested by The Ranting Chef

Cannonball Ice Ball Tray

Cannonball Ice Ball Tray

Pat Geyer, of Rantings of an Amateur Chef, puts HIC’s Cannonball Ice Ball Tray to the test. Pat conducts a melt test of a regular ice cube vs. a sphere shaped ice ball made in the Cannonball Ice Ball Tray, and captures the event with time-lapse photography. Read more

Pat embarks on frequent culinary adventures, kindly sharing his lessons and excitement with lucky fans. Check out his blog as he explores recipes, restaurants, gadgets and anything else related to cooking and eating.

Looking for a Cannonball Ice Ball Tray? Contact the HIC team, and we’ll help you out.